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Next Democracy

The deeper causes of Belarusian popular mobilisation

By Ekaterina Pierson-Lyzhina / 4 December, 2020

The mass mobilisation in Belarus in 2020, like Ukraine’s 2004 Orange Revolution, is a form of post-electoral protest. The mobilisation was triggered by state repression against the opposition and blatant falsifications of the 9 August presidential election results. Several factors contributed to the politicisation of Belarusians. The new opposition conducted […]

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Belarus at the crossroad: what role for Europe?

By Liutauras Gudžinskas / 4 December, 2020

President Alexander Lukashenko has lost legitimacy. He is no longer in control of the situation in the country. But the structures of repression are still on his side. They are likely to continue to support him, as the Kremlin successfully discourages the West from intervening more actively in Belarus. Who […]

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Against the EU’s passivity towards Belarus

By Ireneusz Bil / 4 December, 2020

The mass protests in Belarus are unprecedented in the nation’s history. Hundreds of thousands of people went to the streets regularly to protest against the falsification of the election results. Some still do. Not only the scale, but also the duration of the protests is surprising. Despite brutal interventions by […]

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From a symbolic to an effective foreign policy – the EU in Belarus

By Fernando Rejon Sanchez / 4 December, 2020

The EU’s institutional, economic and political channels to exert influence on Belarus are limited. All the contrary to Russia’s multifaceted and well-institutionalised strategy vis-à-it’s small western neighbour. However, a realistic acknowledgement of the EU’s capabilities is no excuse for self-complacency and determinism. The quest of the Belarussian people for democracy […]

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Belarus protests: the role of women and young people

By Ana Pirtskhalava / 4 December, 2020

The Belarusian writer, 2015 Nobel Prize in Literature winner, and one of my favourite authors has written a book named “The Unwomanly Face of War” but unlike the war, the protest against the regime and President Alexander Lukashenko, known as ‘Europe’s last dictator’ in the streets of all major cities […]

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Urban development in Allende’s Chile: going up!

By Genaro Cuadros Ibáñez / 3 September, 2020

At the time of Salvador Allende’s election victory on 4 September 1970, Chile was experiencing accelerated urbanisation that was deeply unequal. Confronting the housing deficit, and providing access to urban services and facilities would be one of the challenges of Allende’s Popular government. With creativity and involvement of the people, […]

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Salvador Allende: respect for the world

By Juan Somavía / 3 September, 2020

When Salvador Allende entered the General Assembly of the United Nations, a very exceptional thing happened: there was huge, spontaneous applause from the delegates, who rose to their feet. At the end of his speech, the president of Chile was again cheered at length with a persistent standing ovation. This […]

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Salvador Allende: his ethical, social and democratic legacy

By Marcela Ahumada / 31 August, 2020

On 4 September 1970, fifty years ago, the socialist doctor Salvador Allende won the elections and became President of the Republic of Chile. In the middle of the cold war, for the first time in Latin America, a socialist came to power through elections, democratically and in freedom. Fifty years […]

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The imperfect democracy of Cape Verde: time to democratize democracy

By Roselma Évora / 12 July, 2018

In 1990, Cape Verde became one of the first African countries to introduce democratic reforms after fifteen years under a single-party authoritarian rule. It is nowadays perceived by literature and the international community as an exceptional case and a paradigm of consolidation of democracy in Africa.

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Empirical effects of direct democracy

By Stefan Voigt / 28 October, 2019

Direct democracy tools are neither panacea, nor a danger to democracy – but they do influence decision making.

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