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Continuing the fight for shorter working time.jpg

Continuing the fight for shorter working time

By Frances O'Grady / 10 December, 2019

Working time has always been a key battleground for working people and their trade unions. Now, as technology and the platform economy increasingly eat into workers’ personal time, a shorter working week is again necessary. A four-day week, without loss of pay, is one of our ambitions! The demand for...

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It’s time for a 4 days working week!

By Aidan Harper / 10 December, 2019

A shorter working week has always been central to the labour movement. With the rapidly approaching tipping point towards climate breakdown and the automation of many work processes, steered by new technologies like AI, the issue is back to the forefront of progressive politics! The eight-hour day and the two-day...

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Why Ireland’s low tax policy has survived for so long

By David Jacobson / 2 December, 2019

Ireland has had an industrial policy based on low corporate tax. This was first applied only to Multinational Enterprises (MNEs). Later, on the insistence of the EU, it was applied across the board. But MNEs were still able to exploit some tax provisions that enabled them to have significant advantages...

Reforming tax policy: a European fight!

Reforming tax policy: a European fight!

By Joseph Stiglitz / 2 December, 2019

In several Member States, parties have campaigned for “no new taxes” and for lowering the tax burden. They neglect the fact, however, that to improve the tax system at home, there is a European angle to address. A better slogan would be “smarter taxes”. A strategy is needed, that combines...

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Global tax injustice: what are the solutions?

By Antonio Gambini / 2 December, 2019

Since the early 1980s, the incomes of the richest individuals and corporate profits have benefited from increasingly favourable statutory tax rates. In addition, legally and/or illegally these incomes and profits are moved offshore to further escape taxation. Solutions to this tax injustice however do exist. Source : Alvaredo F., Chancel...

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The deceptive opposition between nationalists and progressives

By Didier Fassin / 12 November, 2019

Thinking he could replay the scenario of his 2017 presidential campaign, during which he had presented himself as a bulwark against the far right, the French President Emmanuel Macron made the alternative between progressives and nationalists the central issue in the European elections. But is his authoritarian neoliberalism so far...

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“A decade before the Berlin Wall came down, the corrosion of the social welfare state started with the neoliberal turn”

By Wolfgang Engler / 8 November, 2019

The German sociologist Wolfgang Engler examines the question what happened to (Eastern) Germany in the past three decades since the fall of the Berlin Wall from the inside. In his last book – together with the journalist and writer Jana Hensel – “Wer wir sind. Die Erfahrung, ostdeutsch zu sein”...

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Defending Progressivism

By Patrick Diamond / 28 October, 2019

The French president Emmanuel Macron claims to embody today’s progressivism, as opposed to ‘nationalism’. The profound difficulty for his concept though is that he lacks both a rigorous analysis of capitalism, and a clear understanding of the enduring importance of nation-states. A new concept of progressivism in Europe has to...

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Empirical effects of direct democracy

By Stefan Voigt / 28 October, 2019

Direct democracy is often discussed from a normative angle: supporters praise its deliberative and participatory qualities whereas critics doubt that the citizens are sufficiently well informed to make far-reaching decisions directly. This contribution analyses direct democracy from an empirical angle: it delves into the effects that direct democracy tools have...

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Lisbon: a decade of Participatory Budget

By Miguel Silva Graça / 28 October, 2019

Amongst the many European cities that have made their experiences with Participatory Budgeting (PB), Lisbon was the first capital city, already in 2008. The experience has shown that PB clearly lead to a better performance of the municipality itself, by providing a better public service and pursuing fairer public policies,...

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