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Democracy

Fighting precarity: a paradigm shift from equality-in-prosperity to solidarity-in-wellbeing

By Albena Azmanova / 15 February, 2021

We stand at a pivotal point in history – one that contains the opportunity to replace the equality-in-prosperity formula of progressive politics with a new one: solidarity-in-wellbeing. For the past 100 years, the critique of capitalism has centred on unfair distributive outcomes (economic inequality), as well as the damage that […]

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Israeli Progressives should reach out more to their international partners

By Nimrod Goren / 14 January, 2021

The progressive camp in Israel has been trying for years to find its way back to the corridors of power and influence. So far unsuccessfully. Those seeking ways for change often wonder whether the solution to Israel’s problems will emerge from outside, for example driven by international action. Or if […]

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The Israeli right: authoritarianism and ethnic supremacy

By Roee Kibrik / 13 January, 2021

To understand Israel properly, one must get to know the political right, its characteristics, components, and the changes it has undergone in recent years. The right has been in power since 1977, save for the brief terms of Yitzhak Rabin (1974–77, 1992–95) and Ehud Barak (1999-2001) as prime ministers. It […]

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From bored to horrified: the Romanian elections of 2020

By Cornel Ban / 11 December, 2020

These were meant to be the most boring elections in Romania since 1990. Polls anticipated an easy victory for the centre-right coalition of the National Liberals (PDL/ EPP) and the liberal USR-PLUS (Renew Europe). Defying opinion polls however, the Social-Democrats (PSD) came first (29 percent), and the centre-right received substantially […]

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Belarus’ painful path to transition

By Katia Glod / 4 December, 2020

Belarus is in the deepest political crisis in its modern history. Public protests of hundreds of thousands, representing all social layers and groups, have continued for four months, and spread across the whole country. They initially erupted following the largely flawed presidential election on 9 August, in which the incumbent […]

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Interview with Aleksander Kwaśniewski

By Ania Skrzypek / 14 March, 2021

The former Polish president Alexander Kwaśniewski (1995-2005) has long been an advocate of regional cooperation in central and eastern Europe. During his presidency, he not only oversaw his country’s accession to the European Union (2004), but just a few months later, when the ‘Orange Revolution’ began in neighbouring Ukraine, he […]

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The deeper causes of Belarusian popular mobilisation

By Ekaterina Pierson-Lyzhina / 4 December, 2020

The mass mobilisation in Belarus in 2020, like Ukraine’s 2004 Orange Revolution, is a form of post-electoral protest. The mobilisation was triggered by state repression against the opposition and blatant falsifications of the 9 August presidential election results. Several factors contributed to the politicisation of Belarusians. The new opposition conducted […]

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Time for Democrats to join forces across the Atlantic

By Knut Dethlefsen / 9 November, 2020

The victory of Joe Biden and Kamala Harris over Donald Trump and Mike Pence is a historical event, evidenced by shows of elation as people dance and celebrate in front of the White House. Screams of joy and cheering can be heard in American neighbourhoods. This country can breathe again, […]

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Belarus at the crossroad: what role for Europe?

By Liutauras Gudžinskas / 4 December, 2020

President Alexander Lukashenko has lost legitimacy. He is no longer in control of the situation in the country. But the structures of repression are still on his side. They are likely to continue to support him, as the Kremlin successfully discourages the West from intervening more actively in Belarus. Who […]

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Against the EU’s passivity towards Belarus

By Ireneusz Bil / 4 December, 2020

The mass protests in Belarus are unprecedented in the nation’s history. Hundreds of thousands of people went to the streets regularly to protest against the falsification of the election results. Some still do. Not only the scale, but also the duration of the protests is surprising. Despite brutal interventions by […]

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